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August 20, 2015

St. Bernard

Psalm 40: 5-10

You have multiplied, O Lord my God, your wondrous deeds and your thoughts toward us; none can compare with you. Were I to proclaim and tell of them, they would be more than can be counted.

Sacrifice and offering you do not desire, but you have given me an open ear. Burnt offering and sin offering you have not required.

Then I said, “Here I am; in the scroll of the book it is written of me.

I delight to do your will, O my God; your law is within my heart.”

I have told the glad news of deliverance in the great congregation; see, I have not restrained my lips, as you know, O Lord.

I have not hidden your saving help within my heart, I have spoken of your faithfulness and your salvation; I have not concealed your steadfast love and your faithfulness from the great congregation.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

Gratitude and Praise

For me, today’s Psalm 40 builds as sense of excitement, joy and celebration.

The responsorial psalm is a familiar aspect to Catholic liturgy. It regularly brings these beautiful prayers into each liturgy. The response that each congregant expresses several times at each liturgy fosters our participation and reinforces a key theme from that psalm.

On the other hand, the responses create breaks in the reading of the psalm, cutting into the flow and movement of the prayer. Many people find great spiritual perspective and insight by reading through the psalms. And because many psalms are expressed in the first person, thereby becoming the words of the person making the prayer, they can help us to find words to express in prayer deep and strong feelings such as fear or resentment or anger, as well as joy and trust, gratitude and celebration.  

—Fr. Glen Chun, S.J. is a campus ministry chaplain at Loyola University Chicago, IL, as well as the peripatetic minister of the Loyola University Jesuit community.

Prayer

O praise the Lord, all you nations; glorify God, you peoples.
For steadfast is God’s love for us, God is faithful forever.

—Psalm 117


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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August 20, 2015

St. Bernard

Psalm 40: 5-10

You have multiplied, O Lord my God, your wondrous deeds and your thoughts toward us; none can compare with you. Were I to proclaim and tell of them, they would be more than can be counted.

Sacrifice and offering you do not desire, but you have given me an open ear. Burnt offering and sin offering you have not required.

Then I said, “Here I am; in the scroll of the book it is written of me.

I delight to do your will, O my God; your law is within my heart.”

I have told the glad news of deliverance in the great congregation; see, I have not restrained my lips, as you know, O Lord.

I have not hidden your saving help within my heart, I have spoken of your faithfulness and your salvation; I have not concealed your steadfast love and your faithfulness from the great congregation.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved. http://www.usccb.org/bible/approved-translation

Gratitude and Praise

For me, today’s Psalm 40 builds as sense of excitement, joy and celebration.

The responsorial psalm is a familiar aspect to Catholic liturgy. It regularly brings these beautiful prayers into each liturgy. The response that each congregant expresses several times at each liturgy fosters our participation and reinforces a key theme from that psalm.

On the other hand, the responses create breaks in the reading of the psalm, cutting into the flow and movement of the prayer. Many people find great spiritual perspective and insight by reading through the psalms. And because many psalms are expressed in the first person, thereby becoming the words of the person making the prayer, they can help us to find words to express in prayer deep and strong feelings such as fear or resentment or anger, as well as joy and trust, gratitude and celebration.  

—Fr. Glen Chun, S.J. is a campus ministry chaplain at Loyola University Chicago, IL, as well as the peripatetic minister of the Loyola University Jesuit community.

Prayer

O praise the Lord, all you nations; glorify God, you peoples.
For steadfast is God’s love for us, God is faithful forever.

—Psalm 117


Please share the Good Word with your friends!