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May 15, 2017

St. Isidore the Farmer

Jn 14: 21-26

They who have my commandments and keep them are those who love me; and those who love me will be loved by my Father, and I will love them and reveal myself to them.” Judas (not Iscariot) said to him, “Lord, how is it that you will reveal yourself to us, and not to the world?” Jesus answered him, “Those who love me will keep my word, and my Father will love them, and we will come to them and make our home with them. Whoever does not love me does not keep my words; and the word that you hear is not mine, but is from the Father who sent me.

”I have said these things to you while I am still with you. But the Advocate, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you everything, and remind you of all that I have said to you.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Our Gospel Identity

The other day my two-year-old daughter called to me from the living room: “Jordan! Come here please!”  I immediately blamed my brother who probably let her overhear The Simpsons where Bart likewise addresses his father, Homer.

“No, Tess,” I replied, “I’m Daddy.” She was confused. “Not Jordan?” Now I was stuck. How to explain that I am both?

Our names matter because they reveal who we are to other people. Barnabas and Paul “tore their garments” because the crowds called them gods. The apostles knew they were not gods, but humans zealously energized by experiencing the risen Christ. They “looked intently” at someone in need and empowered him.

The Good Spirit, as St. Ignatius says, looks at us similarly today: it is a gift to know who we really are.  Whatever our title or name, as Christians we can find identity, individually and together, in service to the Gospel.

—Jordan Skarr works in the Office of Pastoral Ministries for the Midwest Jesuits.

Prayer

Lord, make us turn to You, 
show us Your face and we shall be saved.

—David Haas, © GIA Publications, Inc.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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May 15, 2017

St. Isidore the Farmer

Jn 14: 21-26

They who have my commandments and keep them are those who love me; and those who love me will be loved by my Father, and I will love them and reveal myself to them.” Judas (not Iscariot) said to him, “Lord, how is it that you will reveal yourself to us, and not to the world?” Jesus answered him, “Those who love me will keep my word, and my Father will love them, and we will come to them and make our home with them. Whoever does not love me does not keep my words; and the word that you hear is not mine, but is from the Father who sent me.

”I have said these things to you while I am still with you. But the Advocate, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you everything, and remind you of all that I have said to you.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Our Gospel Identity

The other day my two-year-old daughter called to me from the living room: “Jordan! Come here please!”  I immediately blamed my brother who probably let her overhear The Simpsons where Bart likewise addresses his father, Homer.

“No, Tess,” I replied, “I’m Daddy.” She was confused. “Not Jordan?” Now I was stuck. How to explain that I am both?

Our names matter because they reveal who we are to other people. Barnabas and Paul “tore their garments” because the crowds called them gods. The apostles knew they were not gods, but humans zealously energized by experiencing the risen Christ. They “looked intently” at someone in need and empowered him.

The Good Spirit, as St. Ignatius says, looks at us similarly today: it is a gift to know who we really are.  Whatever our title or name, as Christians we can find identity, individually and together, in service to the Gospel.

—Jordan Skarr works in the Office of Pastoral Ministries for the Midwest Jesuits.

Prayer

Lord, make us turn to You, 
show us Your face and we shall be saved.

—David Haas, © GIA Publications, Inc.


Please share the Good Word with your friends!