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February 16, 2019

Mk 8:1-10

In those days when there was again a great crowd without anything to eat, he called his disciples and said to them, “I have compassion for the crowd, because they have been with me now for three days and have nothing to eat. If I send them away hungry to their homes, they will faint on the way—and some of them have come from a great distance.” His disciples replied, “How can one feed these people with bread here in the desert?” He asked them, “How many loaves do you have?” They said, “Seven.”

Then he ordered the crowd to sit down on the ground; and he took the seven loaves, and after giving thanks he broke them and gave them to his disciples to distribute; and they distributed them to the crowd. They had also a few small fish; and after blessing them, he ordered that these too should be distributed.

They ate and were filled; and they took up the broken pieces left over, seven baskets full. Now there were about four thousand people. And he sent them away. And immediately he got into the boat with his disciples and went to the district of Dalmanutha.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Meeting our needs

In the New American Bible translation of today’s Gospel that we hear at Mass, the disciples’ question is translated “where can anyone get enough bread to satisfy them in this deserted place?”  Basically, in a place that seems devoid of nourishment, how can we find what we need?

While the disciples are speaking literally, this is also a question we may ask ourselves when it comes to our own prayer and spiritual lives.  Even St. Teresa of Calcutta, someone we think of as having a rich interior spiritual life, struggled to see God at times. In our world that can sometimes seem devoid of kindness and compassion, it can be easy to miss God’s presence.  But just as the physical needs of the 4,000 were met by Jesus, so too can our need for a deeper connection to Christ be met simply by making our needs known.

What is a need in your heart that you can bring to prayer today?

—The Jesuit Prayer team

Prayer

Jesus, hear my prayer. If this pleases you, if my pain and suffering, my darkness and separation gives you a drop of consolation, my own Jesus do with me as you wish, as long as you wish, without a single glance at my feelings and pain. I am your own. Imprint on my soul and life the sufferings of your heart. Don’t mind my feelings; don’t mind even my pain, if my suffering separation from you brings others to you, and in their love and company you find joy and pleasure.

—St. Teresa of Calcutta in a letter to Jesus, from Mother Teresa: Come Be My Light

 


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February 15, 2019

St Claude de la Colombière, SJ

Mk 7:31-37

Then he returned from the region of Tyre, and went by way of Sidon towards the Sea of Galilee, in the region of the Decapolis. They brought to him a deaf man who had an impediment in his speech; and they begged him to lay his hand on him. He took him aside in private, away from the crowd, and put his fingers into his ears, and he spat and touched his tongue. Then looking up to heaven, he sighed and said to him, “Ephphatha,” that is, “Be opened.”

And immediately his ears were opened, his tongue was released, and he spoke plainly. Then Jesus ordered them to tell no one; but the more he ordered them, the more zealously they proclaimed it. They were astounded beyond measure, saying, “He has done everything well; he even makes the deaf to hear and the mute to speak.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

What is our faith based on?

I find it interesting how often Jesus orders people not to tell anyone about the miracles he has performed.  Generally, they don’t listen and instead proclaim the news far and wide. I have to wonder why he doesn’t want the word to get out.  News like that would – and did – draw people to him in droves, and wasn’t that a good thing? But perhaps he didn’t want people to believe in him solely on the basis of the miracles he performed.  There is more to faith than that, especially the faith that Jesus invites us to. The Kingdom of God that Jesus preached and lived is about how we love one another, not about what our God can do for us.

This then begs the question – what do we base our faith on?  On what God can do for us? Whether or not our prayers are answered?  Or is our faith grounded in something deeper, such as our love for God and for one another and our identity as God’s children?

—Mandy Dillon is a Retreat Coordinator at Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House in Barrington, IL.

Prayer

Nothing is more practical than
finding God, than
falling in Love
in a quite absolute, final way.
What you are in love with,
what seizes your imagination, will affect everything.
It will decide
what will get you out of bed in the morning,
what you do with your evenings,
how you spend your weekends,
what you read, whom you know,
what breaks your heart,
and what amazes you with joy and gratitude.
Fall in Love, stay in love,
and it will decide everything.

—Attributed to Pedro Arrupe, SJ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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February 14, 2019

Sts. Cyril and Methodius

Mk 7:24-30

From there he set out and went away to the region of Tyre. He entered a house and did not want anyone to know he was there. Yet he could not escape notice, but a woman whose little daughter had an unclean spirit immediately heard about him, and she came and bowed down at his feet.

Now the woman was a Gentile, of Syrophoenician origin. She begged him to cast the demon out of her daughter. He said to her, “Let the children be fed first, for it is not fair to take the children’s food and throw it to the dogs.” But she answered him, “Sir, even the dogs under the table eat the children’s crumbs.” Then he said to her, “For saying that, you may go—the demon has left your daughter.” So she went home, found the child lying on the bed, and the demon gone.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Asking for your deepest desire

Using your imagination – you can see Jesus in this house where he’s gone for a little escape. But even here in Tyre, land of Gentiles, his fame draws people to him. The Syrophoenician woman who enters is daring. She dares to be alone with Jesus, a Jew and a man. She dares to ask him for help when he has hidden himself away. And she is the only person we know of who wins an argument with him. Jesus is surprised, impressed. Perhaps he laughs with pleasure at her repartee. But her focus is on her daughter, and Jesus heals the child.

Place yourself in the scene, in all its vivid detail. Perhaps you take the place of the woman, asking Jesus for your deepest desire. How does he respond?

Spend a few moments in conversation with Jesus – listening as well as talking.

—Catherine Heinhold is the Pastoral Assistant for Ignatian Programming at Holy Trinity Catholic Church in Washington, D.C. where she facilitates prayer programs and the Young Adult Community.

Prayer

Lord, help me to see where I can be more daring in my faith – and where I might need to be open to changing my mind. Amen.

—Catherine Heinhold

 

 

 

 

 


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Feburary 13, 2019

Gen 2:4b-9, 15-17

These are the generations of the heavens and the earth when they were created.

In the day that the Lord God made the earth and the heavens, when no plant of the field was yet in the earth and no herb of the field had yet sprung up—for the Lord God had not caused it to rain upon the earth, and there was no one to till the ground; but a stream would rise from the earth, and water the whole face of the ground— then the Lord God formed man from the dust of the ground,and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and the man became a living being.

And the Lord God planted a garden in Eden, in the east; and there he put the man whom he had formed. Out of the ground the Lord God made to grow every tree that is pleasant to the sight and good for food, the tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.

The Lord God took the man and put him in the garden of Eden to till it and keep it. And the Lord God commanded the man, ‘You may freely eat of every tree of the garden; but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil you shall not eat, for in the day that you eat of it you shall die.’

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Caring for God’s Creation

In today’s first reading we are given a tremendous responsibility and a tremendous gift. The responsibility is tilling and keeping God’s creation. The gift is freedom to interact with that creation as we see fit. It’s our choice how we want to coexist with the physical world in which we live.

On World Environment Day, Pope Francis challenged us. “… this task entrusted to us by God the Creator requires us to grasp the rhythm and logic of creation. But we are often driven by pride of domination, of possessions, manipulation, of exploitation; we do not ‘care’ for it, we do not respect it, we do not consider it as a free gift that we must care for.”

A free gift that calls us to be stewards of our earth. Living as Adam and Eve did before the fall, in harmony with nature, enjoying the fruits so abundantly provided. Tilling and keeping creation so all who inhabit this planet might enjoy this abundance.

In my own way, how do I till and keep creation?

—Tom Drexler is the Executive Director of the Ignatian Spirituality Project, a ministry providing Ignatian retreats to men and women experiencing homelessness.

Prayer

Praised be my Lord God with all creatures;
and especially our brother the sun,
which brings us the day, and the light;
fair is he, and shining with a very great splendor:
O Lord, he signifies you to us!
Praised be my Lord for our sister the moon,
and for the stars,
which God has set clear and lovely in heaven.

—Excerpt from Canticle of the Sun by St. Francis of Assisi

 

 

 


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February 12, 2019

Gen 1:20-2:4A

And God said, “Let the waters bring forth swarms of living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth across the dome of the sky.” So God created the great sea monsters and every living creature that moves, of every kind, with which the waters swarm, and every winged bird of every kind. And God saw that it was good. God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” And there was evening and there was morning, the fifth day.

And God said, “Let the earth bring forth living creatures of every kind: cattle and creeping things and wild animals of the earth of every kind.” And it was so. God made the wild animals of the earth of every kind, and the cattle of every kind, and everything that creeps upon the ground of every kind. And God saw that it was good.

Then God said, “Let us make humankind in our image, according to our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the birds of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the wild animals of the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps upon the earth.” So God created humankind in his image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them. God blessed them, and God said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth and subdue it; and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the air and over every living thing that moves upon the earth.”

God said, “See, I have given you every plant yielding seed that is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree with seed in its fruit; you shall have them for food. And to every beast of the earth, and to every bird of the air, and to everything that creeps on the earth, everything that has the breath of life, I have given every green plant for food.” And it was so.

God saw everything that he had made, and indeed, it was very good. And there was evening and there was morning, the sixth day.

Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all their multitude. And on the seventh day God finished the work that he had done, and he rested on the seventh day from all the work that he had done. So God blessed the seventh day and hallowed it, because on it God rested from all the work that he had done in creation.

These are the generations of the heavens and the earth when they were created. In the day that the Lord God made the earth and the heavens.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

God made all things good

Sometimes when I open this app or open the lectionary to read at Mass I get overwhelmed by the length of any given reading. It isn’t simply the number of words in any given passage that I can find intimidating but also feeling that there is so much goodness, too much it feels, to take in. So let me sum up what we read today:

“God made the world. It is good.
God made flying, swimming, and creepy crawling things. They are good.
God made you in his imagine. You are good.
God made everyone else in his image, they are good too.
God worked hard for us, then rested, showing us that rest is good too.”

Today, what part of this reading do you need the most help with? Seeing the weather as good? Seeing your coworkers as good? Seeing yourself as good? Seeing your rest as good?

—Br. Matt Wooters, SJ, is a social worker at Nativity Jesuit Academy in Milwaukee, WI.

Prayer

Dear God help me find rest in your goodness,

help me rest in my goodness,

help me rest in the goodness of others,

help me see the goodness of rest.

Amen.

—Br. Matt Wooters, SJ

 


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February 11, 2019

Mk 6:53-56

When they had crossed over, they came to land at Gennesaret and moored the boat. When they got out of the boat, people at once recognized him, and rushed about that whole region and began to bring the sick on mats to wherever they heard he was. And wherever he went, into villages or cities or farms, they laid the sick in the marketplaces, and begged him that they might touch even the fringe of his cloak; and all who touched it were healed.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Jesus in the interruptions

At this point in his ministry, Jesus can’t really go anywhere without people looking for him.  If I were Jesus, I would have mixed feelings about this. Certainly, Jesus came to health the sick and they were coming to him for healing.  On the other hand, he must have been exhausted.

I go into every day with a plan for what I want to accomplish.  Every day, though, there are interruptions… people who need me to do something or who simply need me to listen to them.  Sometime this can be a point of frustration because I just want to get done what I had planned. My perspective changes when I try to see that these people that come to me are Jesus asking for my time.  

Today, try to see each interruption as an invitation from Jesus.  How does that change how you feel about these disruptions in your plans?

—Kay Gregg is the Assistant Department Chair of Campus Ministry at Loyola Academy in Wilmette, IL.

Prayer

God,
Help me to see you in the interruptions…
In the people who show up unannounced
In the project that needs to be done immediately
In the phone call that distracts me
In the e-mail that reminds me of something I forgot to do.
Help me to see you in the interruptions.

Amen

—Kay Gregg

 

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February 10, 2019

Lk 5:1-11

Once while Jesus was standing beside the lake of Gennesaret, and the crowd was pressing in on him to hear the word of God, he saw two boats there at the shore of the lake; the fishermen had gone out of them and were washing their nets. He got into one of the boats, the one belonging to Simon, and asked him to put out a little way from the shore. Then he sat down and taught the crowds from the boat. When he had finished speaking, he said to Simon, “Put out into the deep water and let down your nets for a catch.” Simon answered, “Master, we have worked all night long but have caught nothing. Yet if you say so, I will let down the nets.”

When they had done this, they caught so many fish that their nets were beginning to break. So they signaled their partners in the other boat to come and help them. And they came and filled both boats, so that they began to sink. But when Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus’ knees, saying, “Go away from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man!”

For he and all who were with him were amazed at the catch of fish that they had taken;and so also were James and John, sons of Zebedee, who were partners with Simon. Then Jesus said to Simon, “Do not be afraid; from now on you will be catching people.” When they had brought their boats to shore, they left everything and followed him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Strike Out into the Deep Water

As an engineering student, three courses in chemistry and one in fluid mechanics seemed a good class schedule. Soon, though, I was failing two courses. Problems surfaced faster than I could handle. Anxiety was consuming my resilience.

In my time of desperation, Jesus came to the rescue, forging a deeper prayer relationship with me and re-centering my life path. As terrible as it was to struggle, my life opened to Jesus in a new way. In hindsight, one could argue for caution; yet, when I could not control the storm, I begged God to act in me in a new way.

Ignatius encouraged retreatants to be generous in offering themselves as disciples of Jesus, learning from the lives of the saints. What dream thrills me to strike out in a new way, to brave the deep water? Which saint is my hero?

—Fr. Paul Deutsch, SJ, belongs to the Central and Southern Province of the Jesuits and is Sophomore Counselor at Jesuit High School in Tampa, FL.

Prayer

Grant me, O Lord, to see everything now with new eyes,
to discern and test the spirits that help me to read the signs of the time,
to relish the things that are yours,
and to communicate them to others.
Give me the clarity of understanding that you gave Ignatius.

—Fr. Pedro Arrupe, SJ

 


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February 9, 2019

Mk 6:30-34

The apostles gathered around Jesus, and told him all that they had done and taught. He said to them, “Come away to a deserted place all by yourselves and rest a while.” For many were coming and going, and they had no leisure even to eat. And they went away in the boat to a deserted place by themselves.

Now many saw them going and recognized them, and they hurried there on foot from all the towns and arrived ahead of them. As he went ashore, he saw a great crowd; and he had compassion for them, because they were like sheep without a shepherd; and he began to teach them many things.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Come and Rest

What a gift for any one of us when someone offers their helpto go on an errand, to drive across town, to shop, to clean, to help in one way or the other. Sometimes I may be asked to clean up a mess I didn’t make, or stretched to the limit because someone else didn’t show up, or caught up in normal family or personal chaos. In such situations, how healing it would be to hear the words: “come and rest a little.”

Yet that is exactly what Jesus does. He invites us to bring him our personal needs and those of people we love. To lay before him the conflicts and personal issues, the worries of friends and family, the hopes and failures that are part of our daily routine. Imagine sitting quietly with Jesus before you; imagine Jesus looking into your eyes and saying: “Come and rest awhile; there is nothing here that you and I cannot manage together.”

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

I heard the voice of Jesus say, “Come unto me and rest;
Lay down, O weary one, lay down your head upon my breast.”
I came to Jesus as I was, so weary, worn and sad;
I found in him a resting place, and he has made me glad.

I heard the voice of Jesus say, “Behold I freely give
the living water; thirsty one, stoop down, and drink, and live.”
I came to Jesus and I drank of that life-giving stream;
My thirst was quenched, my soul revived, and now I live in him.

Verses of I Heard the Voice of Jesus Say by Horatius Bonar (1808-1889)

 

 

 


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February 8, 2019

Heb 13:1-8

Let mutual love continue. Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for by doing that some have entertained angels without knowing it. Remember those who are in prison, as though you were in prison with them; those who are being tortured, as though you yourselves were being tortured. Let marriage be held in honor by all, and let the marriage bed be kept undefiled; for God will judge fornicators and adulterers.

Keep your lives free from the love of money, and be content with what you have; for he has said, “I will never leave you or forsake you.” So we can say with confidence, “The Lord is my helper; I will not be afraid. What can anyone do to me?” Remember your leaders, those who spoke the word of God to you; consider the outcome of their way of life, and imitate their faith. Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Ministry of hospitality

As someone working in ministry at a retreat house, the beginning of today’s first reading jumps out at me: “do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for by doing that some have entertained angels without knowing it.” Hospitality is clearly one of our core values here at Bellarmine. We welcome those who come here on retreat and do all we can to make sure that they feel taken care of and can experience the love of God.

We are all called to the ministry of hospitality regardless of the work we do or our state in life. Every single person we come in contact with is a child of God, and that fact alone means they deserve our care and respect. I don’t remember this often enough, and sometimes find myself becoming short-tempered or annoyed with people around me. This reading today is a good reminder to stop and really look for the presence of Christ in everyone I meet.

What angels have you entertained – or not – lately?

—Mandy Dillon is a Retreat Coordinator at Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House in Barrington, IL.

Prayer

Loving God,
each person I encounter is one of your children.
Help me to always remember that
and to do my best to give them the love and respect they deserve.
In this way I can make my own small contribution
to building up your kingdom here and now.
Amen.

—Mandy Dillon

 


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February 7, 2019

Mk 6:7-13

He called the twelve and began to send them out two by two, and gave them authority over the unclean spirits. He ordered them to take nothing for their journey except a staff; no bread, no bag, no money in their belts; but to wear sandals and not to put on two tunics. He said to them, “Wherever you enter a house, stay there until you leave the place. If any place will not welcome you and they refuse to hear you, as you leave, shake off the dust that is on your feet as a testimony against them.”

So they went out and proclaimed that all should repent. They cast out many demons, and anointed with oil many who were sick and cured them.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

We are all called to be missionaries

Today we see Jesus’ disciples become missionaries for the first time. A missionary is often depicted as someone who goes to another country, like St. Francis Xavier and so many others. But when I went to Brazil to serve as a missionary, I was surprised to find that lay Brazilian Catholics called themselves missionaries even if they’d never left the city they were from. They rightly understood their pastoral, social service, and social justice work in prisons, with the sick, or as catechists, to be the work of mission.

To be “sent” in mission is not to travel far, but to leave our church buildings to proclaim and be the Good News in the world. This scripture reminds us that our faith is not a gift to keep for ourselves. We are sent by Jesus Christ to go out into the world to witness, in word and action, to God’s love. How can I be a missionary disciple today?

—Catherine Heinhold is the Pastoral Assistant for Ignatian Programming at Holy Trinity Catholic Church in Washington, D.C. where she facilitates prayer programs and the Young Adult Community.

Prayer

Loving God, give me the grace today to be a missionary disciple. Depending only on your love, send me forth to proclaim the Good News with my words and with my actions. Draw me especially close in service and solidarity with individuals and communities living on the margins. In Jesus name I pray, Amen.

—Catherine Heinhold

 

 


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February 16, 2019

Mk 8:1-10

In those days when there was again a great crowd without anything to eat, he called his disciples and said to them, “I have compassion for the crowd, because they have been with me now for three days and have nothing to eat. If I send them away hungry to their homes, they will faint on the way—and some of them have come from a great distance.” His disciples replied, “How can one feed these people with bread here in the desert?” He asked them, “How many loaves do you have?” They said, “Seven.”

Then he ordered the crowd to sit down on the ground; and he took the seven loaves, and after giving thanks he broke them and gave them to his disciples to distribute; and they distributed them to the crowd. They had also a few small fish; and after blessing them, he ordered that these too should be distributed.

They ate and were filled; and they took up the broken pieces left over, seven baskets full. Now there were about four thousand people. And he sent them away. And immediately he got into the boat with his disciples and went to the district of Dalmanutha.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Meeting our needs

In the New American Bible translation of today’s Gospel that we hear at Mass, the disciples’ question is translated “where can anyone get enough bread to satisfy them in this deserted place?”  Basically, in a place that seems devoid of nourishment, how can we find what we need?

While the disciples are speaking literally, this is also a question we may ask ourselves when it comes to our own prayer and spiritual lives.  Even St. Teresa of Calcutta, someone we think of as having a rich interior spiritual life, struggled to see God at times. In our world that can sometimes seem devoid of kindness and compassion, it can be easy to miss God’s presence.  But just as the physical needs of the 4,000 were met by Jesus, so too can our need for a deeper connection to Christ be met simply by making our needs known.

What is a need in your heart that you can bring to prayer today?

—The Jesuit Prayer team

Prayer

Jesus, hear my prayer. If this pleases you, if my pain and suffering, my darkness and separation gives you a drop of consolation, my own Jesus do with me as you wish, as long as you wish, without a single glance at my feelings and pain. I am your own. Imprint on my soul and life the sufferings of your heart. Don’t mind my feelings; don’t mind even my pain, if my suffering separation from you brings others to you, and in their love and company you find joy and pleasure.

—St. Teresa of Calcutta in a letter to Jesus, from Mother Teresa: Come Be My Light

 


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February 15, 2019

St Claude de la Colombière, SJ

Mk 7:31-37

Then he returned from the region of Tyre, and went by way of Sidon towards the Sea of Galilee, in the region of the Decapolis. They brought to him a deaf man who had an impediment in his speech; and they begged him to lay his hand on him. He took him aside in private, away from the crowd, and put his fingers into his ears, and he spat and touched his tongue. Then looking up to heaven, he sighed and said to him, “Ephphatha,” that is, “Be opened.”

And immediately his ears were opened, his tongue was released, and he spoke plainly. Then Jesus ordered them to tell no one; but the more he ordered them, the more zealously they proclaimed it. They were astounded beyond measure, saying, “He has done everything well; he even makes the deaf to hear and the mute to speak.”

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

What is our faith based on?

I find it interesting how often Jesus orders people not to tell anyone about the miracles he has performed.  Generally, they don’t listen and instead proclaim the news far and wide. I have to wonder why he doesn’t want the word to get out.  News like that would – and did – draw people to him in droves, and wasn’t that a good thing? But perhaps he didn’t want people to believe in him solely on the basis of the miracles he performed.  There is more to faith than that, especially the faith that Jesus invites us to. The Kingdom of God that Jesus preached and lived is about how we love one another, not about what our God can do for us.

This then begs the question – what do we base our faith on?  On what God can do for us? Whether or not our prayers are answered?  Or is our faith grounded in something deeper, such as our love for God and for one another and our identity as God’s children?

—Mandy Dillon is a Retreat Coordinator at Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House in Barrington, IL.

Prayer

Nothing is more practical than
finding God, than
falling in Love
in a quite absolute, final way.
What you are in love with,
what seizes your imagination, will affect everything.
It will decide
what will get you out of bed in the morning,
what you do with your evenings,
how you spend your weekends,
what you read, whom you know,
what breaks your heart,
and what amazes you with joy and gratitude.
Fall in Love, stay in love,
and it will decide everything.

—Attributed to Pedro Arrupe, SJ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

February 14, 2019

Sts. Cyril and Methodius

Mk 7:24-30

From there he set out and went away to the region of Tyre. He entered a house and did not want anyone to know he was there. Yet he could not escape notice, but a woman whose little daughter had an unclean spirit immediately heard about him, and she came and bowed down at his feet.

Now the woman was a Gentile, of Syrophoenician origin. She begged him to cast the demon out of her daughter. He said to her, “Let the children be fed first, for it is not fair to take the children’s food and throw it to the dogs.” But she answered him, “Sir, even the dogs under the table eat the children’s crumbs.” Then he said to her, “For saying that, you may go—the demon has left your daughter.” So she went home, found the child lying on the bed, and the demon gone.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Asking for your deepest desire

Using your imagination – you can see Jesus in this house where he’s gone for a little escape. But even here in Tyre, land of Gentiles, his fame draws people to him. The Syrophoenician woman who enters is daring. She dares to be alone with Jesus, a Jew and a man. She dares to ask him for help when he has hidden himself away. And she is the only person we know of who wins an argument with him. Jesus is surprised, impressed. Perhaps he laughs with pleasure at her repartee. But her focus is on her daughter, and Jesus heals the child.

Place yourself in the scene, in all its vivid detail. Perhaps you take the place of the woman, asking Jesus for your deepest desire. How does he respond?

Spend a few moments in conversation with Jesus – listening as well as talking.

—Catherine Heinhold is the Pastoral Assistant for Ignatian Programming at Holy Trinity Catholic Church in Washington, D.C. where she facilitates prayer programs and the Young Adult Community.

Prayer

Lord, help me to see where I can be more daring in my faith – and where I might need to be open to changing my mind. Amen.

—Catherine Heinhold

 

 

 

 

 


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Feburary 13, 2019

Gen 2:4b-9, 15-17

These are the generations of the heavens and the earth when they were created.

In the day that the Lord God made the earth and the heavens, when no plant of the field was yet in the earth and no herb of the field had yet sprung up—for the Lord God had not caused it to rain upon the earth, and there was no one to till the ground; but a stream would rise from the earth, and water the whole face of the ground— then the Lord God formed man from the dust of the ground,and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and the man became a living being.

And the Lord God planted a garden in Eden, in the east; and there he put the man whom he had formed. Out of the ground the Lord God made to grow every tree that is pleasant to the sight and good for food, the tree of life also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.

The Lord God took the man and put him in the garden of Eden to till it and keep it. And the Lord God commanded the man, ‘You may freely eat of every tree of the garden; but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil you shall not eat, for in the day that you eat of it you shall die.’

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Caring for God’s Creation

In today’s first reading we are given a tremendous responsibility and a tremendous gift. The responsibility is tilling and keeping God’s creation. The gift is freedom to interact with that creation as we see fit. It’s our choice how we want to coexist with the physical world in which we live.

On World Environment Day, Pope Francis challenged us. “… this task entrusted to us by God the Creator requires us to grasp the rhythm and logic of creation. But we are often driven by pride of domination, of possessions, manipulation, of exploitation; we do not ‘care’ for it, we do not respect it, we do not consider it as a free gift that we must care for.”

A free gift that calls us to be stewards of our earth. Living as Adam and Eve did before the fall, in harmony with nature, enjoying the fruits so abundantly provided. Tilling and keeping creation so all who inhabit this planet might enjoy this abundance.

In my own way, how do I till and keep creation?

—Tom Drexler is the Executive Director of the Ignatian Spirituality Project, a ministry providing Ignatian retreats to men and women experiencing homelessness.

Prayer

Praised be my Lord God with all creatures;
and especially our brother the sun,
which brings us the day, and the light;
fair is he, and shining with a very great splendor:
O Lord, he signifies you to us!
Praised be my Lord for our sister the moon,
and for the stars,
which God has set clear and lovely in heaven.

—Excerpt from Canticle of the Sun by St. Francis of Assisi

 

 

 


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February 12, 2019

Gen 1:20-2:4A

And God said, “Let the waters bring forth swarms of living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth across the dome of the sky.” So God created the great sea monsters and every living creature that moves, of every kind, with which the waters swarm, and every winged bird of every kind. And God saw that it was good. God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” And there was evening and there was morning, the fifth day.

And God said, “Let the earth bring forth living creatures of every kind: cattle and creeping things and wild animals of the earth of every kind.” And it was so. God made the wild animals of the earth of every kind, and the cattle of every kind, and everything that creeps upon the ground of every kind. And God saw that it was good.

Then God said, “Let us make humankind in our image, according to our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the birds of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the wild animals of the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps upon the earth.” So God created humankind in his image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them. God blessed them, and God said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth and subdue it; and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the air and over every living thing that moves upon the earth.”

God said, “See, I have given you every plant yielding seed that is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree with seed in its fruit; you shall have them for food. And to every beast of the earth, and to every bird of the air, and to everything that creeps on the earth, everything that has the breath of life, I have given every green plant for food.” And it was so.

God saw everything that he had made, and indeed, it was very good. And there was evening and there was morning, the sixth day.

Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all their multitude. And on the seventh day God finished the work that he had done, and he rested on the seventh day from all the work that he had done. So God blessed the seventh day and hallowed it, because on it God rested from all the work that he had done in creation.

These are the generations of the heavens and the earth when they were created. In the day that the Lord God made the earth and the heavens.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

God made all things good

Sometimes when I open this app or open the lectionary to read at Mass I get overwhelmed by the length of any given reading. It isn’t simply the number of words in any given passage that I can find intimidating but also feeling that there is so much goodness, too much it feels, to take in. So let me sum up what we read today:

“God made the world. It is good.
God made flying, swimming, and creepy crawling things. They are good.
God made you in his imagine. You are good.
God made everyone else in his image, they are good too.
God worked hard for us, then rested, showing us that rest is good too.”

Today, what part of this reading do you need the most help with? Seeing the weather as good? Seeing your coworkers as good? Seeing yourself as good? Seeing your rest as good?

—Br. Matt Wooters, SJ, is a social worker at Nativity Jesuit Academy in Milwaukee, WI.

Prayer

Dear God help me find rest in your goodness,

help me rest in my goodness,

help me rest in the goodness of others,

help me see the goodness of rest.

Amen.

—Br. Matt Wooters, SJ

 


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February 11, 2019

Mk 6:53-56

When they had crossed over, they came to land at Gennesaret and moored the boat. When they got out of the boat, people at once recognized him, and rushed about that whole region and began to bring the sick on mats to wherever they heard he was. And wherever he went, into villages or cities or farms, they laid the sick in the marketplaces, and begged him that they might touch even the fringe of his cloak; and all who touched it were healed.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Jesus in the interruptions

At this point in his ministry, Jesus can’t really go anywhere without people looking for him.  If I were Jesus, I would have mixed feelings about this. Certainly, Jesus came to health the sick and they were coming to him for healing.  On the other hand, he must have been exhausted.

I go into every day with a plan for what I want to accomplish.  Every day, though, there are interruptions… people who need me to do something or who simply need me to listen to them.  Sometime this can be a point of frustration because I just want to get done what I had planned. My perspective changes when I try to see that these people that come to me are Jesus asking for my time.  

Today, try to see each interruption as an invitation from Jesus.  How does that change how you feel about these disruptions in your plans?

—Kay Gregg is the Assistant Department Chair of Campus Ministry at Loyola Academy in Wilmette, IL.

Prayer

God,
Help me to see you in the interruptions…
In the people who show up unannounced
In the project that needs to be done immediately
In the phone call that distracts me
In the e-mail that reminds me of something I forgot to do.
Help me to see you in the interruptions.

Amen

—Kay Gregg

 

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February 10, 2019

Lk 5:1-11

Once while Jesus was standing beside the lake of Gennesaret, and the crowd was pressing in on him to hear the word of God, he saw two boats there at the shore of the lake; the fishermen had gone out of them and were washing their nets. He got into one of the boats, the one belonging to Simon, and asked him to put out a little way from the shore. Then he sat down and taught the crowds from the boat. When he had finished speaking, he said to Simon, “Put out into the deep water and let down your nets for a catch.” Simon answered, “Master, we have worked all night long but have caught nothing. Yet if you say so, I will let down the nets.”

When they had done this, they caught so many fish that their nets were beginning to break. So they signaled their partners in the other boat to come and help them. And they came and filled both boats, so that they began to sink. But when Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus’ knees, saying, “Go away from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man!”

For he and all who were with him were amazed at the catch of fish that they had taken;and so also were James and John, sons of Zebedee, who were partners with Simon. Then Jesus said to Simon, “Do not be afraid; from now on you will be catching people.” When they had brought their boats to shore, they left everything and followed him.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Strike Out into the Deep Water

As an engineering student, three courses in chemistry and one in fluid mechanics seemed a good class schedule. Soon, though, I was failing two courses. Problems surfaced faster than I could handle. Anxiety was consuming my resilience.

In my time of desperation, Jesus came to the rescue, forging a deeper prayer relationship with me and re-centering my life path. As terrible as it was to struggle, my life opened to Jesus in a new way. In hindsight, one could argue for caution; yet, when I could not control the storm, I begged God to act in me in a new way.

Ignatius encouraged retreatants to be generous in offering themselves as disciples of Jesus, learning from the lives of the saints. What dream thrills me to strike out in a new way, to brave the deep water? Which saint is my hero?

—Fr. Paul Deutsch, SJ, belongs to the Central and Southern Province of the Jesuits and is Sophomore Counselor at Jesuit High School in Tampa, FL.

Prayer

Grant me, O Lord, to see everything now with new eyes,
to discern and test the spirits that help me to read the signs of the time,
to relish the things that are yours,
and to communicate them to others.
Give me the clarity of understanding that you gave Ignatius.

—Fr. Pedro Arrupe, SJ

 


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February 9, 2019

Mk 6:30-34

The apostles gathered around Jesus, and told him all that they had done and taught. He said to them, “Come away to a deserted place all by yourselves and rest a while.” For many were coming and going, and they had no leisure even to eat. And they went away in the boat to a deserted place by themselves.

Now many saw them going and recognized them, and they hurried there on foot from all the towns and arrived ahead of them. As he went ashore, he saw a great crowd; and he had compassion for them, because they were like sheep without a shepherd; and he began to teach them many things.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Come and Rest

What a gift for any one of us when someone offers their helpto go on an errand, to drive across town, to shop, to clean, to help in one way or the other. Sometimes I may be asked to clean up a mess I didn’t make, or stretched to the limit because someone else didn’t show up, or caught up in normal family or personal chaos. In such situations, how healing it would be to hear the words: “come and rest a little.”

Yet that is exactly what Jesus does. He invites us to bring him our personal needs and those of people we love. To lay before him the conflicts and personal issues, the worries of friends and family, the hopes and failures that are part of our daily routine. Imagine sitting quietly with Jesus before you; imagine Jesus looking into your eyes and saying: “Come and rest awhile; there is nothing here that you and I cannot manage together.”

—The Jesuit Prayer Team

Prayer

I heard the voice of Jesus say, “Come unto me and rest;
Lay down, O weary one, lay down your head upon my breast.”
I came to Jesus as I was, so weary, worn and sad;
I found in him a resting place, and he has made me glad.

I heard the voice of Jesus say, “Behold I freely give
the living water; thirsty one, stoop down, and drink, and live.”
I came to Jesus and I drank of that life-giving stream;
My thirst was quenched, my soul revived, and now I live in him.

Verses of I Heard the Voice of Jesus Say by Horatius Bonar (1808-1889)

 

 

 


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February 8, 2019

Heb 13:1-8

Let mutual love continue. Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for by doing that some have entertained angels without knowing it. Remember those who are in prison, as though you were in prison with them; those who are being tortured, as though you yourselves were being tortured. Let marriage be held in honor by all, and let the marriage bed be kept undefiled; for God will judge fornicators and adulterers.

Keep your lives free from the love of money, and be content with what you have; for he has said, “I will never leave you or forsake you.” So we can say with confidence, “The Lord is my helper; I will not be afraid. What can anyone do to me?” Remember your leaders, those who spoke the word of God to you; consider the outcome of their way of life, and imitate their faith. Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Ministry of hospitality

As someone working in ministry at a retreat house, the beginning of today’s first reading jumps out at me: “do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for by doing that some have entertained angels without knowing it.” Hospitality is clearly one of our core values here at Bellarmine. We welcome those who come here on retreat and do all we can to make sure that they feel taken care of and can experience the love of God.

We are all called to the ministry of hospitality regardless of the work we do or our state in life. Every single person we come in contact with is a child of God, and that fact alone means they deserve our care and respect. I don’t remember this often enough, and sometimes find myself becoming short-tempered or annoyed with people around me. This reading today is a good reminder to stop and really look for the presence of Christ in everyone I meet.

What angels have you entertained – or not – lately?

—Mandy Dillon is a Retreat Coordinator at Bellarmine Jesuit Retreat House in Barrington, IL.

Prayer

Loving God,
each person I encounter is one of your children.
Help me to always remember that
and to do my best to give them the love and respect they deserve.
In this way I can make my own small contribution
to building up your kingdom here and now.
Amen.

—Mandy Dillon

 


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February 7, 2019

Mk 6:7-13

He called the twelve and began to send them out two by two, and gave them authority over the unclean spirits. He ordered them to take nothing for their journey except a staff; no bread, no bag, no money in their belts; but to wear sandals and not to put on two tunics. He said to them, “Wherever you enter a house, stay there until you leave the place. If any place will not welcome you and they refuse to hear you, as you leave, shake off the dust that is on your feet as a testimony against them.”

So they went out and proclaimed that all should repent. They cast out many demons, and anointed with oil many who were sick and cured them.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

We are all called to be missionaries

Today we see Jesus’ disciples become missionaries for the first time. A missionary is often depicted as someone who goes to another country, like St. Francis Xavier and so many others. But when I went to Brazil to serve as a missionary, I was surprised to find that lay Brazilian Catholics called themselves missionaries even if they’d never left the city they were from. They rightly understood their pastoral, social service, and social justice work in prisons, with the sick, or as catechists, to be the work of mission.

To be “sent” in mission is not to travel far, but to leave our church buildings to proclaim and be the Good News in the world. This scripture reminds us that our faith is not a gift to keep for ourselves. We are sent by Jesus Christ to go out into the world to witness, in word and action, to God’s love. How can I be a missionary disciple today?

—Catherine Heinhold is the Pastoral Assistant for Ignatian Programming at Holy Trinity Catholic Church in Washington, D.C. where she facilitates prayer programs and the Young Adult Community.

Prayer

Loving God, give me the grace today to be a missionary disciple. Depending only on your love, send me forth to proclaim the Good News with my words and with my actions. Draw me especially close in service and solidarity with individuals and communities living on the margins. In Jesus name I pray, Amen.

—Catherine Heinhold

 

 


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