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June 1, 2019

St. Justin, martyr

Jn 16: 23B-28

On that day you will ask nothing of me. Very truly, I tell you, if you ask anything of the Father in my name, he will give it to you. Until now you have not asked for anything in my name.  Ask and you will receive, so that your joy may be complete.

‘I have said these things to you in figures of speech. The hour is coming when I will no longer speak to you in figures, but will tell you plainly of the Father. On that day you will ask in my name. I do not say to you that I will ask the Father on your behalf; for the Father himself loves you, because you have loved me and have believed that I came from God.

I came from the Father and have come into the world; again, I am leaving the world and am going to the Father.’

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Hearts open to receive God’s word

“Sound beliefs do not enter into the hard and disobedient heart… I choose to follow not men or men’s beliefs, but God…”  – St. Justin the Martyr

Today is the feast day of St. Justin the Martyr (100-165).  He was martyred alongside some of his students. He is considered the foremost interpreter of the theory of the Logos in the second century. Logos is God’s Word, the principle of Divine reason and creative order.

In his Spiritual Exercises, St. Ignatius writes, “As we continue to make progress in the spiritual life, the movement of the good spirit is very delicate, gentle, and often delightful.  The good spirit touches us in a way that a drop of water penetrates a sponge. When the evil spirit tries to interrupt our progress, the movement is violent, disturbing, and confusing.  The way that the evil spirit touches our lives is more like water hitting hard upon a stone.” ( Spiritual Exercises, 335)

There is a painting of St. Ignatius by Noreen Mallory, a Canadian artist.  Ignatius is holding a stone in one hand, a sponge in the other. Two tear drops fall from his eyes, one on the sponge, one on the stone. God can only enter a heart that is soft, accepting, humble, compassionate.  The heart that is closed-off to others, to love, cannot be penetrated by God’s love. Ignatius calls hearts “to every increase of faith, hope, and love, and all interior joy that invites and attracts to what is heavenly, what is God’s love, filling us with peace and quiet in its Creator and Lord” (Spiritual Exercises, 317). The “enemy of human nature,” what Ignatius calls the devil, brings only confusion, darkness, anxiety, raising obstacles brought on by false reasoning.  This enemy can only attack a heart closed-off to God’s love.

—Greg Richard has served at St. John’s Jesuit High School in Toledo, OH for thirty-three years.  He has been the director of Campus Ministry, Theology teacher, Theology department chair, coach, and Adult Chaplain.  He is now the Vice President for Ignatian Identity.

Prayer

The message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.

—1 Cor 1:18


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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June 1, 2019

St. Justin, martyr

Jn 16: 23B-28

On that day you will ask nothing of me. Very truly, I tell you, if you ask anything of the Father in my name, he will give it to you. Until now you have not asked for anything in my name.  Ask and you will receive, so that your joy may be complete.

‘I have said these things to you in figures of speech. The hour is coming when I will no longer speak to you in figures, but will tell you plainly of the Father. On that day you will ask in my name. I do not say to you that I will ask the Father on your behalf; for the Father himself loves you, because you have loved me and have believed that I came from God.

I came from the Father and have come into the world; again, I am leaving the world and am going to the Father.’

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Hearts open to receive God’s word

“Sound beliefs do not enter into the hard and disobedient heart… I choose to follow not men or men’s beliefs, but God…”  – St. Justin the Martyr

Today is the feast day of St. Justin the Martyr (100-165).  He was martyred alongside some of his students. He is considered the foremost interpreter of the theory of the Logos in the second century. Logos is God’s Word, the principle of Divine reason and creative order.

In his Spiritual Exercises, St. Ignatius writes, “As we continue to make progress in the spiritual life, the movement of the good spirit is very delicate, gentle, and often delightful.  The good spirit touches us in a way that a drop of water penetrates a sponge. When the evil spirit tries to interrupt our progress, the movement is violent, disturbing, and confusing.  The way that the evil spirit touches our lives is more like water hitting hard upon a stone.” ( Spiritual Exercises, 335)

There is a painting of St. Ignatius by Noreen Mallory, a Canadian artist.  Ignatius is holding a stone in one hand, a sponge in the other. Two tear drops fall from his eyes, one on the sponge, one on the stone. God can only enter a heart that is soft, accepting, humble, compassionate.  The heart that is closed-off to others, to love, cannot be penetrated by God’s love. Ignatius calls hearts “to every increase of faith, hope, and love, and all interior joy that invites and attracts to what is heavenly, what is God’s love, filling us with peace and quiet in its Creator and Lord” (Spiritual Exercises, 317). The “enemy of human nature,” what Ignatius calls the devil, brings only confusion, darkness, anxiety, raising obstacles brought on by false reasoning.  This enemy can only attack a heart closed-off to God’s love.

—Greg Richard has served at St. John’s Jesuit High School in Toledo, OH for thirty-three years.  He has been the director of Campus Ministry, Theology teacher, Theology department chair, coach, and Adult Chaplain.  He is now the Vice President for Ignatian Identity.

Prayer

The message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.

—1 Cor 1:18


Please share the Good Word with your friends!