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July 8, 2019

Mt 9: 18-26

While he was saying these things to them, suddenly a leader of the synagogue came in and knelt before him, saying, “My daughter has just died; but come and lay your hand on her, and she will live.” And Jesus got up and followed him, with his disciples. Then suddenly a woman who had been suffering from hemorrhages for twelve years came up behind him and touched the fringe of his cloak, for she said to herself, “If I only touch his cloak, I will be made well.” Jesus turned, and seeing her he said, “Take heart, daughter; your faith has made you well.” And instantly the woman was made well. When Jesus came to the leader’s house and saw the flute players and the crowd making a commotion, he said, “Go away; for the girl is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him. But when the crowd had been put outside, he went in and took her by the hand, and the girl got up. And the report of this spread throughout that district.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Trust Sparks Joy

In his 2019 Ash Wednesday homily at Rockhurst University, Fr. Sean Salai, SJ, encouraged the faithful to view Lenten sacrifices through the lens of Marie Kondo, the Japanese organizing consultant of Netflix fame.  When coaching her clients to simplify, Marie Kondo invites them to hold items (an old shirt, a knick-knack on a shelf, etc.) that are cluttering their space. If that item sparks joy, then she advises to keep it. If not, then it needs to go!  Fr. Salai invited us to channel our inner Marie Kondo for Lent: instead of “giving up” chocolate for 40 days, we were encouraged to “let go” of habits that fail to spark joy in our relationship with self, God, and others.

In St. Ignatius’ First Principle and Foundation, he advises the “making use of those things that help to bring us closer to God and leaving aside those things that don’t.”  This is the core Ignatian value of indifference, or detachment. This requires trust. Specifically, this requires trust in the Lord, which most certainly can spark lasting, even if not instantaneous, joy.

Bill Kriege serves as the director of campus ministry at Rockhurst University in Kansas City, MO.

Prayer

Patient Trust

Above all, trust in the slow work of God.
We are quite naturally impatient in everything
to reach the end without delay.
We should like to skip the intermediate stages.
We are impatient of being on the way to something
unknown, something new.
And yet it is the law of all progress
that it is made by passing through
some stages of instability—
and that it may take a very long time. 

And so I think it is with you;
your ideas mature gradually—let them grow,
let them shape themselves, without undue haste.
Don’t try to force them on,
as though you could be today what time
(that is to say, grace and circumstances
acting on your own good will)
will make of you tomorrow. 

Only God could say what this new spirit
gradually forming within you will be.
Give Our Lord the benefit of believing
that his hand is leading you,
and accept the anxiety of feeling yourself
in suspense and incomplete.

Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, SJ


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

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July 8, 2019

Mt 9: 18-26

While he was saying these things to them, suddenly a leader of the synagogue came in and knelt before him, saying, “My daughter has just died; but come and lay your hand on her, and she will live.” And Jesus got up and followed him, with his disciples. Then suddenly a woman who had been suffering from hemorrhages for twelve years came up behind him and touched the fringe of his cloak, for she said to herself, “If I only touch his cloak, I will be made well.” Jesus turned, and seeing her he said, “Take heart, daughter; your faith has made you well.” And instantly the woman was made well. When Jesus came to the leader’s house and saw the flute players and the crowd making a commotion, he said, “Go away; for the girl is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at him. But when the crowd had been put outside, he went in and took her by the hand, and the girl got up. And the report of this spread throughout that district.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

Trust Sparks Joy

In his 2019 Ash Wednesday homily at Rockhurst University, Fr. Sean Salai, SJ, encouraged the faithful to view Lenten sacrifices through the lens of Marie Kondo, the Japanese organizing consultant of Netflix fame.  When coaching her clients to simplify, Marie Kondo invites them to hold items (an old shirt, a knick-knack on a shelf, etc.) that are cluttering their space. If that item sparks joy, then she advises to keep it. If not, then it needs to go!  Fr. Salai invited us to channel our inner Marie Kondo for Lent: instead of “giving up” chocolate for 40 days, we were encouraged to “let go” of habits that fail to spark joy in our relationship with self, God, and others.

In St. Ignatius’ First Principle and Foundation, he advises the “making use of those things that help to bring us closer to God and leaving aside those things that don’t.”  This is the core Ignatian value of indifference, or detachment. This requires trust. Specifically, this requires trust in the Lord, which most certainly can spark lasting, even if not instantaneous, joy.

Bill Kriege serves as the director of campus ministry at Rockhurst University in Kansas City, MO.

Prayer

Patient Trust

Above all, trust in the slow work of God.
We are quite naturally impatient in everything
to reach the end without delay.
We should like to skip the intermediate stages.
We are impatient of being on the way to something
unknown, something new.
And yet it is the law of all progress
that it is made by passing through
some stages of instability—
and that it may take a very long time. 

And so I think it is with you;
your ideas mature gradually—let them grow,
let them shape themselves, without undue haste.
Don’t try to force them on,
as though you could be today what time
(that is to say, grace and circumstances
acting on your own good will)
will make of you tomorrow. 

Only God could say what this new spirit
gradually forming within you will be.
Give Our Lord the benefit of believing
that his hand is leading you,
and accept the anxiety of feeling yourself
in suspense and incomplete.

Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, SJ


Please share the Good Word with your friends!